The Next Page
Episode 38: Knowledge Rising Series - Carla McKirdy & Klas Moldéus on co-creation and Young UN: Agents for Change

Episode 38: Knowledge Rising Series - Carla McKirdy & Klas Moldéus on co-creation and Young UN: Agents for Change

November 27, 2020

Twitter_Banner_-_Ep_38_1_6a5j1.png

Today, we continue with our Knowledge Rising Series dedicated to conversations with young activists, knowledge-shapers and change-makers. In episode 38, we are joined by Carla McKirdy and Klas Moldéus, members of Young UN: Agents for Change.

Established in 2016, Young UN is a cross-UN, global and inclusive network with more than 2,000 members across UN entities in over 80 duty stations. A voluntary and decentralized global network, Young UN fosters a space to catalyze, amplify and accelerate change by crowdsourcing ideas, driving innovation and advocating for cultural change for UN values and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) from the bottom-up.

Carla and Klas speak on the values of the Young UN network and their ongoing mission to create a space where innovation and new ideas are encouraged and developed. The two also speak on bridging the gap between Young UN and the mechanisms of the larger international bureaucracy of the United Nations, and the continuous ways they are collaborating and conversing with many different parts of the organization.

Just as “Agents for Change” is the network’s motto, Carla and Klas also emphasize the importance of embodying these very words themselves, in their everyday. As young professionals, and young UN staff members, they continue to work towards a shared vision of a UN that fully embodies the principles it stands for.

About Carla McKirdy

Carla has years of experience in communications and advocacy, encompassing journalism, content marketing, knowledge management and multimedia production in both the private and public sectors. Carla has worked for the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. In addition, she has worked for the Department of Global Communications (DGC) in New York, United States, the United Nations Assistance to the Khmer Rouge Trials (UNAKRT) in Phnom Penh, Cambodia and the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, Netherlands in different capacities. Currently, she is working at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), as the Associate Public Information Officer on the Young Professionals Programme (YPP).

About Klas Moldéus

Klas Moldéus is working with United Nations Water based in Geneva, Switzerland. Having grown up in Sweden, he has since led sustainable development and startup initiatives in countries including Myanmar, Kenya and Ethiopia. Klas Moldéus is a passionate advocate for sustainable development and innovation, and as part of the Young UN network he has contributed to several initiatives promoting environmental sustainability, bottom-up approaches and driving innovation at the UN.

Resources 

Learn more about Young UN: http://www.young-un.org/

Read the transcript here: https://bit.ly/364KLit

Content

Speakers: Klas Moldéus & Carla McKirdy

Host/Editor: Natalie Alexander 

Producer: Karen Lee

Images: Photos by Klas Moldéus / Carla McKirdy

Social media designs and transcript: Karen Lee 

Recorded & produced at the UN Geneva Library & Archives 

 

 

Episode 37: Conversation - Philosopher and Professor Souleymane Diagne on achieving our humanity together.

Episode 37: Conversation - Philosopher and Professor Souleymane Diagne on achieving our humanity together.

November 20, 2020

Twitter_Banner_-_Ep_37_3_7ti2g.png

Episode 37 brings you a philosophical view on global cooperation, multilateralism and diversity. We speak with Professor Souleymane Bachir Diagne, a Senegalese philosopher who is currently the Director of the Institute of African Studies, as well as Professor of French and of Philosophy at Columbia University in the City of New York. 

In this conversation, Professor Diagne shares the need to replenish pluralism and diversity in the practice of philosophy today, and to understand the bridges that have connected the philosophies of the world throughout history. He also reflects on global languages, and how each language itself brings a perspective on the world that tests the universality of our own thinking.  

We also touch upon philosophy in our daily lives - how can the principles of philosophy help us to face our common global challenges, including the climate crisis and pandemics? He shares the philosophical concepts he believes are critical to restitute in order to move forward together. 

We hope this episode brings you food for thought and action. 

Resources 

Learn more about Professor Souleymane Diagne: https://french.columbia.edu/content/souleymane-bachir-diagne

Find out about Professor Diagne’s books and publications: https://french.columbia.edu/content/diagne

Read the transcript here: https://bit.ly/2Hf94AK

Content

Speaker: Professor Souleymane Bachir Diagne

Host/Editor: Natalie Alexander 

Producer: Karen Lee

Images: Photo by Charlotte Force / Columbia University in the City of New York. 

Social media designs and transcript: Karen Lee 

Recorded & produced at the UN Geneva Library & Archives 

Episode 36: Special Episode - The World’s Most Traveled Document, with Gudrun Beger & Colin Wells

Episode 36: Special Episode - The World’s Most Traveled Document, with Gudrun Beger & Colin Wells

November 18, 2020

Summer_Special_Episode_6_6gpgc.png

While we cannot travel much these days, as we work together through COVID-19, we hope this story will take you on a bit of a journey!

Our colleagues Gudrun Beger and Colin Wells, from the Institutional Memory Section at the UN Geneva Library & Archives, join us for a special look into the League of Nations Archives. 

Gudrun is Team Analyst and Colin is Project Manager for the LONTAD Project, the Total Digital Access to the League of Nations Archives Project, which upon completion will ensure free access online to, as well as the digital and physical preservation of, the entire archives of the League of Nations.

For this conversation, Gudrun shares a brief history of The World’s Most Traveled Document: our passports and travel IDs. As part of the team working recently on the processing of the Mixed Archival Nansen Fond, they came across examples of some of the very first modern passports and travel IDs issued. Colin also shares some analysis about what we can find in the Archives on these documents, as well as the importance of the Archives collection to our understanding today of our history, the work of the League and some its lasting impacts, and multilateralism as it evolves and moves forward.  

Resources and Episode Materials 

Images and Credits

Dried bananas, found in the League of Nations Archives (United Nations Archives at Geneva).

dried_bananas_samplebrdlh.jpg

 

Fridtjof Nansen, Norwegian polar explorer, scientist, diplomat, humanitarian and Nobel Peace prize laureate. (Wikimedia Commons: Henry Van der Weyd)

 fridtjof_nansen_wikicommons.jpg

 

Nansen certificate issued in France as an international substitute for a passport, part of the League of Nations Archives (United Nations Archives at Geneva).

nansen_passport_un_archives_collection.jpg   

Passport of a Russian refugee (Konstantin Wlassoff-Klass) containing numerous German stamps, part of the League of Nations Archives (United Nations Archives at Geneva).

early_russian_passport_un_archives_collection8usch.jpg

Content:

Speakers: Gudrun Beger, Colin Wells and Stefan Vukotic.

Host & Editor/Producer: Natalie Alexander.

Images: United Nations Archives at Geneva (see images for more information).

Sound effects: Via Envato Market (Belle Epoque Waltz and WWI Battle Ambience), Soviet March by Shane Ivers (https://www.silvermansound.com) and World of Brothers Allegretto by Dee Yan-Kee).

Recorded & produced by the UN Geneva Library & Archives.

 

Episode 35: Conversation - James Bell on public perception of global cooperation

Episode 35: Conversation - James Bell on public perception of global cooperation

November 13, 2020

Twitter_Banner_-_Ep_35_1_6f7aj.png

In episode 35, James Bell, Vice President of Global Strategy at the Pew Research Center, joins us for a deeper look into one of the Center’s latest research polls on public perception of international cooperation. James and his team surveyed more than 14,000 citizens in 14 different countries, asking participants their opinions on the United Nations and its role in multilateral governance.  

Drawing from his extensive background in research and a specific interest in citizens and how they think and what they care about, James takes us through the research project that was published in September 2020.  

With a special focus on the way in which young people (those aged 18-29) viewed global cooperation, he shares that the findings indicate an encouraging optimism towards multilateralism and the increasing importance of young voices. He also explores the ways in which different global issues – such as the pandemic and climate change – affect public opinion.  

We hope this episode offers you a fresh perspective on the importance of data, research and all of its findings. 

The Research Report – International Cooperation Welcomed Across 14 Advanced Economies: https://pewrsr.ch/3l43bVU

About James Bell

James Bell is vice president of global strategy at Pew Research Center. He plays a leading role in guiding the international research undertaken by the Center. Bell helps to design survey projects, develop questionnaires, analyze data and write reports. Prior to joining the Pew Research Center, Bell worked at the U.S. State Department for nearly a decade, most recently as director of international opinion research. Bell earned his doctorate in geography from the University of Washington in Seattle.

He is an author of The World’s Muslims: Unity and DiversityGlobal Opinion of Obama Slips, International Policies FaultedRussians Back Protests, Political FreedomsEgyptians Remain Optimistic, Embrace Democracy and Religion in Political Life and Religion in Latin America. Bell has appeared on CNN, CNBC, and BBC World Service Radio, and has presented internationally, including at the U.N. Alliance of Civilizations annual conference.

Further Resources

Content

Speakers: James Bell & Karen Lee

Host & Editor/Producer: Karen Lee

Images: James Bell / The Pew Research Center

Social media designs and transcript: Karen Lee 

Recorded & produced at the UN Geneva Library & Archives 

Episode 34: Conversation - Dr. John Pace and the role of civil society in the fabric of human rights

Episode 34: Conversation - Dr. John Pace and the role of civil society in the fabric of human rights

October 30, 2020

Twitter_Banner_-_Ep_34ayhn7.png

In episode 34, Dr. John Pace, former Secretary to the Commission on Human Rights and Coordinator of the Vienna World Conference on Human Rights joins The Next Page to share his knowledge in the field of human rights, while introducing his recently published book, The United Nations Commission on Human Rights, A Very Great Enterprise.  

With more than three decades of experience in humanitarian work, Dr. Pace takes us back in time, with a special focus on the council that began it all: The United Nations Commission on Human Rights. Starting from its inception and moving through its ongoing evolution, he takes us on a journey along the Commission’s rich history and its role in the multilateral protection of human rights. 

He also emphasizes the role of civil society in the discussion and advancement of human rights and multilateral cooperation, and considers the critical questions: how does a topic as universal and intersectional as human rights translate into global cooperation? And why are universal human values important? In this conversation, Dr. Pace richly informs us on a subject that is integral and invaluable to us all.   

 

About Dr. John Pace 

To learn more about his new book: https://bit.ly/3mynCdP
The e-version may also be found on most online book stores.

In the course of a career spanning over fifty years in the field of human rights, John Pace has been involved in a wide range of experiences in human rights and related institutional structures and procedures.  Since leaving regular UN service in 1999, he has held senior positions in the human rights/humanitarian field in Liberia, Iraq, Lebanon, Palestine and Nepal. In the same period, he has worked in various other countries such as Indonesia, Sudan, Cambodia and Vietnam.

He has been involved in the establishment and management of most departments that currently make up the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, such as Special Procedures, Technical Cooperation, and External Relations and in later years, the formation, or re-structuring of teams and management units.  As a senior official, he played an important role in the design and restructuring of the Secretariat upon the creation of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

He is currently Senior Visiting Fellow at the Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales, he also sits on the Board of the Diplomacy Training Programme. He is Adjunct at University of Sydney, School of Law.

Further Resources  

Content

Speakers: John Pace & Karen Lee

Host & Editor/Producer: Karen Lee

Images: John Pace / Karen Lee

Social media designs and transcript: Karen Lee 

Recorded & produced at the UN Geneva Library & Archives 

   

Episode 33: Conversation - Ambassador Umej Bhatia on multilateralism through the eyes of small states

Episode 33: Conversation - Ambassador Umej Bhatia on multilateralism through the eyes of small states

October 16, 2020

Twitter_-_Banner_Ep_33_1_a1mmr.png

In Episode 33, Ambassador Umej Bhatia, Permanent Representative of Singapore to the UN in Geneva and the UN in Vienna, joins The Next Page to speak about multilateralism from the perspective of a small state.  

What kind of distinct importance does multilateralism and diplomacy have for small states? How does a rules-based multilateral order achieve global cooperation? How can small states turn vulnerability into opportunity? And, how have small states come together in the past and the present to further solidify their commitment to multilateralism? Ambassador Umej answers these questions and more, sharing insights from his years of experience not only as an Ambassador but also as an author and historian.  

Ambassador Umej speaks about the various layers of multilateralism, from globalization, micro and macrolateralism to vaccine multilateralism. He also shares some insights on his new book, Our Name is Mutiny, a piece of creative non-fiction exploring the Singaporean experience between the years 1907 and 1915.  

We hope you enjoy the conversation as much as we did!

About Ambassador Umej Bhatia  

Beyond being Singapore's Permanent Representative to the UN, Ambassador Umej is also a writer, historian, Permanent Representative to the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization and Resident Representative to the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna.

To learn more about Ambassador Umej: https://bit.ly/34zvDaP

To learn more about his new book: https://bit.ly/2HWBrnc

Further Resources  

Content

Speakers: Umej Bhatia & Francesco Pisano

Host & Editor/Producer: Karen Lee

Images: Arabian Business / The National

Social media designs and transcript: Karen Lee 

Recorded & produced at the UN Geneva Library & Archives 

Episode 32: Conversation - Historian Margaret MacMillan on the shaping of modern multilateralism

Episode 32: Conversation - Historian Margaret MacMillan on the shaping of modern multilateralism

October 7, 2020

Twitter_-_banner_episode_3291g58.png

In Episode 32, historian, author and professor of history, Margaret MacMillan, joins The Next Page to share some of her insights on the makings of multilateralism as we know it today.   

What are some of the roots of modern multilateral cooperation? How did individuals and institutions promote and build multilateralism, and how did they work to spread their ideas? What is the role of public opinion, and has this changed over time? Professor MacMillan shares some fascinating insights into these questions and more, looking at the beginnings of modern multilateralism in the 19th century, to the creation of the first global multilateral organization, the League of Nations, and the post-1945 era with the beginning of the United Nations. As we mark 100 years of multilateralism in Geneva, she also reflects on the evolution of multilateralism over the years, as well as a few thoughts on the multilateralism of the future. 

As an avid reader and writer of many books on history, she also shares a glimpse of her most recent book, War: How Conflict Shaped Us, soon to be released on 6 October 2020, and a few tips on how she approaches the writing process. Hope you enjoy this listen as much as we did! 

About Professor Margaret MacMillan  

Margaret MacMillan is a Professor of History at the University of Toronto and emeritus Professor of International History and the former Warden of St. Antony's College at the University of Oxford. To learn more about her, visit: http://www.margaretmacmillan.com/Bio.php  

To explore her full collection of books, including Paris 1919: Six Months that Changed the World (2001); The War that Ended Peace (2014); History’s People (2015); and War: How Conflict Shaped Us (2020), visit her website: http://www.margaretmacmillan.com/index.php

Further Resources  

Content

Speakers: Margaret MacMillan & Natalie Alexander 

Host & Editor/Producer: Karen Lee & Natalie Alexander

Editorial Guidance: Pierre-Etienne Bourneuf, Scientific Advisor at UN Geneva Library & Archives

Images: Ander McIntyre

Social media designs and transcript: Karen Lee 

Recorded & produced at the UN Geneva Library & Archives 

Episode 31: Conversation - Dr. David Nabarro on the Impact of COVID-19 on Agenda 2030

Episode 31: Conversation - Dr. David Nabarro on the Impact of COVID-19 on Agenda 2030

September 18, 2020

Twitter_-_Banner_Ep_31_1_9jhh0.png

Welcome to The Next Page podcast. The UN Geneva Library & Archives are back from summer break, with lots of projects coming up in the next few months. Keep up-to-date over at our Twitter and Facebook pages.

In Episode 31 we are joined by Dr. David Nabarro, one of six Special Envoys to the Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO) for the current COVID-19 crisis, and the Strategic Director at 4SD (Skills, Systems and Synergies for Sustainable Development).  

In conversation with our Director Francesco Pisano, David shares his unique insights on the current pandemic, its many challenges, but the largely hopeful vision he has for the future. Speaking from decades of service as a medical doctor, special envoy, and strategic director at 4SD, Dr. David Nabarro takes us through the present pandemic, but more importantly, points us to the future, and the collective cooperation we must all champion.  

We also hear his thoughts on the ways in which he believes COVID-19 will affect Agenda 2030, and the various implications that the virus will have on our path to achieving the sustainable development goals. 

Resources

Learn more about David and 4SD: https://www.4sd.info/

Learn more about Agenda 2030 and the 17 sustainable development goals: https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/transformingourworld

Access the episode transcript here: https://libraryresources.unog.ch/audio/davidnabarro

Content

Speakers: David Nabarro and Francesco Pisano

Host & Editor/Producer: Karen Lee

Images: UN/UNAIDS/David Nabarro (Twitter).

Graphics, social media designs and transcript: Karen Lee

Recorded & produced by the UN Geneva Library & Archives

Episode 30: Conversation - Corinne Momal-Vanian, new Executive Director of the Kofi Annan Foundation

Episode 30: Conversation - Corinne Momal-Vanian, new Executive Director of the Kofi Annan Foundation

September 4, 2020

Twitter_-_Banner_Ep_30_7m1lw.png

Welcome to The Next Page podcast. The UN Geneva Library & Archives are back from summer break, with lots of projects coming up in the next few months. Keep up-to-date over at our Twitter and Facebook pages.

In Episode 30 we are joined by the new Executive Director of the Kofi Annan Foundation, Corinne Momal-Vanian, who recently joined the Foundation after more than 30 years at the UN, including her most recent post as Director of the Division of Conference Management at UN Geneva.

In conversation with our Director Francesco Pisano, Corinne shares about her new role and the work and values of the Kofi Annan Foundation. She also shares her reflections on multilateralism and the current state of the UN today, including some of the challenges its facing, as well as opportunities for how the UN can move forward as we look to multilateralism in the future. 

We also hear her thoughts on women, gender equality and parity, and leadership in international organizations, and the values she’s inspired by from some of our past and present leaders here at the UN. For more inspiration and learning, head to the links below.

Resources

Learn more about Corinne and the Kofi Annan Foundation: https://www.kofiannanfoundation.org/member/corinne-momal-vanian/

Access the episode transcript here: https://libraryresources.unog.ch/c.php?g=673332&p=4880979&t=15286

Other Podcast Episodes

Listen to Episode 4: Conversation on Innovation in International Organisations with Tina Ambos and Corinne Momal-Vanian

Listen to Episode 19: Former President of the Kofi Annan Foundation on his book A Peacekeeper in Africa, Learning from UN Interventions in Other People’s Wars.

Listen to Episode 20: Conversation with Catherine Bertini on Leading Transformational Change in International Organizations

Check out the Library Research Guides on Women and Gender Equality and Women and Global Diplomacy.  

Content

Speakers: Corinne Momal-Vanian and Francesco Pisano

Host & Editor/Producer: Natalie Alexander

Images: Kofi Annan Foundation

Graphics, social media designs and transcript: Karen Lee.

Recorded & produced by the UN Geneva Library & Archives.

Episode 29: Knowledge Rising - Kartik Sawhney on the intersection of accessibility, education and entrepreneurship, and the power of working together.

Episode 29: Knowledge Rising - Kartik Sawhney on the intersection of accessibility, education and entrepreneurship, and the power of working together.

August 21, 2020

Twitter_-_Banner_Ep_2974auk.png

Our Knowledge Rising series is particularly focused on young activists, knowledge-shapers and change-makers. In this episode, we are joined by young activist and UN Young Leader for the Sustainable Development Goals, Kartik Sawhney, who shares about his ongoing work in accessibility, education and entrepreneurship. As a disability advocate and technologist, Kartik has worked to redefine the term “impact” in accessibility, empowering other people with disabilities to be successful in their own pursuits in technology and innovation. 

A computer science graduate of Stanford University, Kartik co-founded I-Stem (previously called Project StemAccess), which provides technical training, mentorship and hands-on opportunities to people with disabilities around the world. As the first blind student to pursue science education in high school in India, he also advocated for accessible and equitable education for other students with disabilities in the country. He is currently a software engineer/AI scientist at Microsoft where he works with the Cortana Team, the company’s virtual assistant. In this conversation, Kartik shares about his unique activism at the intersection of accessibility, education and entrepreneurship, his personal experience as a blind person, and the important role of multilateralism — at the level of individuals, companies and nations —in the fight for accessibility. Suggesting different ways in which we can all help to make a difference, Kartik emphasises the need to work collectively together to achieve truly transformational impact. 

Resources:

Readings:

Content:

Speakers: Kartik Sawhney

Host & Editor/Producer: Karen Lee

Images: Medium Blog

Recorded & produced by the UN Geneva Library & Archives.

Episode 28: Knowledge Rising - Ahmed M. Badr on youth, storytelling and transcending displacement through creative expression.

Episode 28: Knowledge Rising - Ahmed M. Badr on youth, storytelling and transcending displacement through creative expression.

July 22, 2020

Twitter_-_banner_episode_28__6sjkv.png

This episode continues our Knowledge Rising series, which is dedicated to conversations with young people – activists, knowledge-makers, change-makers – on their work and their views on the issues they’re passionate about.

Today, more than 1 per cent of the world’s population, around 79.5 million people, are displaced. This is according to the latest Global Trends Report by UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, and is the highest total the Agency has ever seen.

But displacement is much more than statistics. In this episode we’re joined by Ahmed M. Badr, one of the UN Young Leaders for the Sustainable Development Goals. He’s a writer, multi-media artist, a social entrepreneur and a former Iraqi refugee. He’s now a graduate of Wesleyan University and the founder of Narratio, a platform for youth empowerment through creative expression.

Ahmed shares about his work at Narratio and his interest in the intersection of creativity and youth, particularly youth who’ve been displaced. He underlines the importance of creating spaces for them to tell their own stories, to transcend the circumstances that caused the displacement and to claim their own stories that really move beyond the numbers and the data we often see associated with refugees and displaced persons. Moving forward, he also shares his views on how creativity and multilateralism have much to learn and gain from each other. 

Resources

Content:

Speaker: Ahmed M. Badr

Host & Editor/Producer: Natalie Alexander.

Images: Ahmed M. Badr, Edward Grattan and Bob Zurr. 

Recorded & produced by the UN Geneva Library & Archives.

Episode 27: Conversation - Jerome Bellion-Jourdan on negotiations for the greater good

Episode 27: Conversation - Jerome Bellion-Jourdan on negotiations for the greater good

July 3, 2020

 Episode_27_screenshot_67jf8.png

This episode delves into the world of negotiation. As we mark 100 years of multilateralism in Geneva and the UN turns 75, what is the role of negotiation in the multilateral context? For this conversation, we’re joined by Jerome Bellion-Jourdan for an online recording. He’s currently a Senior Fellow at the Global Governance Centre at the Graduate Institute in Geneva, and before that he served as the lead EU negotiator on a range of thematic issues such as Business and Human Rights as well as country situations in the UN Human Rights Council for almost 9 years. In this conversation, he shares insights into negotiating at the multilateral level, but also some opportunities he sees for change and evolution in the practice of negotiation to address global challenges.

He is currently working to explore the potential for an initiative which would provide the space to experiment new formats of negotiations with notably the use of technology to make them more inclusive, and to foster negotiations towards the greater good. He is supported by a team of individuals from international organisations, governments, business, civil society and others contributing pro bono to prepare for a first experiment of a “virtual and inclusive negotiation for the world after COVID-19”. He also shares on some tips on how we can all bring more inclusive conversations and negotiations into our own fields and daily lives.

Here below are some resources from the conversation and more. 

Resources on the project for an international negotiation platform (Global Governance Centre at the Graduate Institute in Geneva)

Readings:

Content:

Speaker: Jerome Bellion-Jourdan.

Host & Editor/Producer: Natalie Alexander.

Images: UN Geneva Library & Archives, Jerome Bellion-Jourdan.

Recorded & produced at the UN Geneva Library & Archives.

 

Episode 26: Knowledge Rising - Holly Syrett & Colette Grosscurt on the global impact of our wardrobe, and acting for local and multilateral change.

Episode 26: Knowledge Rising - Holly Syrett & Colette Grosscurt on the global impact of our wardrobe, and acting for local and multilateral change.

May 29, 2020

_Twitter_-_banner_post_episode_26_6puw8.png

This episode begins a new series on the podcast called Knowledge Rising, which is dedicated to speaking with young activists, knowledge-shapers and knowledge-makers, in order to hear their own insights on the global issues they’re working on and are passionate about. The series is a space to build our understanding collectively about how we can act on the issues that affect our common future.

We kick off with a conversation on the global impact of what we wear: the fashion and apparel industry. Holly Syrett (Senior Sustainability Manager at the Global Fashion Agenda) and Colette Grosscurt (a Responsible Investment Officer at ACTIAM) are based in Amsterdam and are dedicating a lot of their work to helping change the fashion industry to a more sustainable one. They’re both part of the World Economic Forum’s Global Shapers community, a network of young people driving action and change on global challenges. They together co-founded the initiative called Shaping Fashion, and in this conversation share their own insights into this industry, which accounts for at least 8 to 10 per cent of global greenhouse emissions among other impacts on the environment, labor rights and gender equality. They also share what is needed to bring about change globally through multilateral efforts, but also what we can all do to act now by choosing more consciously what we wear.

Further Resources:

The Shaping Fashion initiative: https://www.weforum.org/projects/shaping-fashion & https://www.globalshapers.org/impact/shaping-fashion

Content:

Speakers: Holly Syrett and Colette Grosscurt.

Host & Editor/Producer: Natalie Alexander.

Images: Holly Syrett and Colette Grosscurt/Shaping Fashion.

Recorded & produced at the UN Geneva Library & Archives.

Episode 25: Scott Weber on the power of building peace through community, trust & resilience.

Episode 25: Scott Weber on the power of building peace through community, trust & resilience.

May 8, 2020

This episode brings a conversation on peace: how is it defined and achieved in communities and societies, and how does it stick? 

UN Geneva Library & Archives Director Francesco Pisano speaks with Scott Weber, the president of Interpeace. Interpeace was originally founded in 1994 by the United Nations, but as it evolved became an independent non-governmental organization in 2000, with continued strong links with the UN.   

Scott has dedicated his career to supporting people in many parts of the world to build peace for themselves. You'll hear his insights into what he sees as vital to measure and to focus on as communities seek to build peace amid conflict and after conflict; what he thinks are some key challenges in current peacemaking and peace-building; and some ways in which Interpeace is framing peace processes and tools in different ways, and building on the knowledge and resilience of communities. 

Interpeace Resources 

To learn more about Interpeace, visit their websitehttps://www.interpeace.org/ and follow Scott Weber on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/Scott_M_Weber  

Library & Archives Resources 

You can also visit our dedicated Research Guide on Peacehttps://libraryresources.unog.ch/peace or our more specific Research Guide on Women and Global Diplomacy: From Peace Movements to the United Nationshttps://libraryresources.unog.ch/womendiplomacy/peace  

Content:

Speakers: Scott Weber & Francesco Pisano.

Host & Editor/Producer: Natalie Alexander.

Image: Interpeace.

Recorded & produced at the UN Geneva Library & Archives.

Edition spéciale : Lancement de « ONU Info Genève »

Edition spéciale : Lancement de « ONU Info Genève »

April 24, 2020

Pour marquer la Journée internationale du multilatéralisme et de la diplomatie au service de la paix (24 avril) et le lancement du nouveau site Web de l'ONU à Genève, le Service de l’information des Nations Unies à Genève présente son nouveau journal radio « ONU Info Genève ».

Tous les vendredis sur le site web de l’ONU à Genève, retrouvez l’essentiel de l’actualité de la semaine du Palais des Nations et de la Genève internationale alimentée par nos journalistes.

Au menu de cette première édition:

  • La Directrice Générale des Nations Unies à Genève, Tatiana Valovaya, qui évoque les deux événements liés à la Journée internationale du multilatéralisme et de la diplomatie au service de la paix.

  • Les conséquences potentiellement désastreuses du Covid-19 sur la sécurité alimentaire.
  • Le Covid-19 ne doit pas éclipser la lutte contre les changements climatiques.
Podbean App

Play this podcast on Podbean App